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ConfigServer-Security-Firewall


SPI iptables firewall that is straight-forward, easy and flexible to configure


###############################################################################
# Copyright 2006-2012, Way to the Web Limited
# URL: http://www.configserver.com
# Email: sales@waytotheweb.com
###############################################################################


ConfigServer Security & Firewall
################################

This suite of scripts provides:

   1. A straight-forward SPI iptables firewall script
   2. A daemon process that checks for Login Authentication
   3. A Control Panel configuration interface
   4. ... and much more!

The reason we have developed this suite is that we have found over the years of 
providing server management services that many of the tools available for the
task are either over-complex, not very friendly, or simply aren't as effective
as they could or should be.


This document contains:

1. Introduction

2. csf Principles

3. lfd Principles

4. csf Command Line Options

5. lfd Command Line Options

6. Login Tracking

7. Script Email Alerts

8. Process Tracking

9. Directory Watching

10. Advanced Allow/Deny Filters

11. Multiple Ethernet Devices

12. Installation on a Generic Linux Server

13. A note about FTP Connection Issues

14. Messenger Service

15. Block Reporting

16. Port Flood Protection

17. External Pre- and Post- Scripts

18. lfd Clustering

19. Watching IP addresses

20. Port Knocking

21. Connection Limit Protection

22. Port/IP address Redirection

23. Integrated User Interface Feature


1. Introduction
###############


ConfigServer Firewall (csf)
===========================

We have developed an SPI iptables firewall that is straight-forward, easy and
flexible to configure and secure with extra checks to ensure smooth operation.

csf can be used on any (supported - see the website) generic Linux OS.

The csf installation includes preconfigured configurations and control panel
UI's for cPanel, DirectAdmin and Webmin

Login Failure Daemon (lfd)
==========================

To complement the ConfigServer Firewall, we have developed a daemon process
that runs all the time and periodically (every X seconds) scans the latest log
file entries for login attempts against your server that continually fail
within a short period of time. Such attempts are often called "Brute-force
attacks" and the daemon process responds very quickly to such patterns and
blocks offending IP's quickly. Other similar products run every x minutes via
cron and as such often miss break-in attempts until after they've finished, our
daemon eliminates such long waits and makes it much more effective at
performing its task.

There are an array of extensive checks that lfd can perform to help alert the
server administrator of changes to the server, potential problems and possible
compromises.

On cPanel servers, lfd is integrated into the WHM > Service Manager, which will
restart lfd if it fails for any reason.

Control Panel Interface
=======================

To help with the ease and flexibility of the suite we have developed a
front-end to both csf and lfd for cPanel, DirectAdmin and Webmin. From there
you can modify the configuration files and stop, start and restart the
applications and check their status. This makes configuring and managing the
firewall very simple indeed.

There is also an abbreviated UI for mobile phone access to Quick Allow, Quick
Deny and Remove Deny. Direct URLs:
    cPanel: https://1.2.3.4:2087/cgi/addon_csf.cgi?mobi=1
    DA: https://1.2.3.4:2222/CMD_PLUGINS_ADMIN/csf/index.html?mobi=1
    Webmin: https://1.2.3.4:10000/csf/?mobi=1

There is, of course, a comprehensive Command Line Interface (CLI) for csf.


2. csf Principles
#################

The idea with csf, as with most iptables firewall configurations, is to block 
everything and then allow through only those connections that you want. This is
done in iptables by DROPPING all connections in and out of the server on all 
protocols. Then allow traffic in and out from existing connections. Then open 
ports up in and outgoing for both TCP and UDP individually.

This way we can control exactly what traffic is allowed in and out of the
server and helps protect the server from malicious attack.

In particular it prevents unauthorised access to network daemons that we want
to restrict access by IP address, and also should a service suffer a
compromise, it can help prevent access to compromise networks daemons, a
typical example being a hackers sshd daemon running on a random open port.
Perhaps the greatest of reasons is to help mitigate the effects of suffering a
root compromise where often they only way to take advantage of such a failure
is to open a daemon for the hacker to access the server on. While this won't
prevent root compromises, it can help slow them down enough for you to notice
and react.

Another way that a port filtering firewall can help is when a user level 
compromise occurs and a hacker installs DOS tools to effect other servers. A 
firewall configured to block outgoing connections except on specific ports can
help prevent DOS attacks from working and make it immediately apparent to you 
from the system logs.

csf has been designed to keep this configuration simple, but still flexible 
enough to give you options to suit your server environment. Often firewall 
scripts can become cumbersome of complex making it impossible to identify where
problems lie and to easily fix them.

To take advantage of kernel logging of iptables dropped connections you should
ensure that kernel logging daemon (klogd) is enabled. Typically, VPS servers
have this disabled and you should check /etc/init.d/syslog and make sure that
any klogd lines are not commented out. If you change the file, remember to
restart syslog.


3. lfd Principles
#################

One of the best ways to protect the server from inbound attack against network 
daemons is to monitor their authentication logs. Invalid login attempts which 
happen in a short space of time from the same source can often mean someone is 
attempting to brute-force their way into the server, usually by guessing 
usernames and passwords and therefore generating authentication and login 
failures.

lfd can monitor the most commonly abused protocols, SSHD, POP3, IMAP, FTP and 
HTTP password protection. Unlike other applications, lfd is a daemon process 
that monitors logs continuously and so can react within seconds of detecting 
such attempts. It also monitors across protocols, so if attempts are made on 
different protocols in a short space of time, all those attempts will be
counted against the threshold.

Once the number of failed login attempts is reached, lfd immediately forks a
sub-process and uses csf to block the offending IP address from both in and
outgoing connections. Stopping the attack in its tracks in a quick and timely
manner. Other applications that use cron job timings to run usually completely
miss brute force attacks as they run usually every 5 minutes or by which time
the attack could be over, or simply biding its time. In the meantime lfd will
have block the offenders IP address.

By running the block and alert email actions in a sub-process, the main daemon
can continue monitoring the logs without delay.

If you want to know when lfd blocks an IP address you can enable the email
alert (which is on by default) and you should watch the log file in
/var/log/lfd.log. If you use logcheck, you can add it to your log monitoring
by editing logcheck.sh and adding the line:

$LOGTAIL /var/log/lfd.log >> $TMPDIR/check.$$      

Add it in amongst the other logs that you have selected.


4. csf Command Line Options
###########################

Before configuring and starting csf for the first time, it is a good idea to
run the script /etc/csf/csftest.pl using:

perl /etc/csf/csftest.pl

This script will test whether the required iptables modules are functioning on
the server. Don't worry if it cannot run all the features, so long as the
script doesn't report any FATAL errors.


You can view the csf command line options by using:

# csf -h

Usage: /usr/sbin/csf [option] [value]

Option              Meaning
-h, --help          Show this message
-l, --status        List/Show iptables configuration
-l6, --status6      List/Show ip6tables configuration
-s, --start         Start firewall rules
-f, --stop          Flush/Stop firewall rules (Note: lfd may restart csf)
-r, --restart       Restart firewall rules
-q, --startq        Quick restart (csf restarted by lfd)
-sf, --startf       Force CLI restart regardless of LF_QUICKSTART setting
-a, --add ip        Allow an IP and add to /etc/csf.allow
-ar, --addrm ip     Remove an IP from /etc/csf.allow and delete rule
-d, --deny ip       Deny an IP and add to /etc/csf.deny
-dr, --denyrm ip    Unblock an IP and remove from /etc/csf.deny
-df, --denyf        Remove and unblock all entries in /etc/csf.deny
-g, --grep ip       Search the iptables rules for an IP match (incl. CIDR)
-t, --temp          Displays the current list of temp IP entries and their TTL
-tr, --temprm ip    Remove an IPs from the temp IP ban and allow list
-td, --tempdeny ip ttl [-p port] [-d direction]
                    Add an IP to the temp IP ban list. ttl is how long to
                    blocks for (default:seconds, can use one suffix of h/m/d).
                    Optional port. Optional direction of block can be one of:
                    in, out or inout (default:in)
-ta, --tempallow ip ttl [-p port] [-d direction]
                    Add an IP to the temp IP allow list (default:inout)
-tf, --tempf        Flush all IPs from the temp IP entries
-cp, --cping        PING all members in an lfd Cluster
-cd, --cdeny ip     Deny an IP in a Cluster and add to /etc/csf.deny
-ca, --callow ip    Allow an IP in a Cluster and add to /etc/csf.allow
-cr, --crm ip       Unblock an IP in a Cluster and remove from /etc/csf.deny
-cc, --cconfig [name] [value]
                    Change configuration option [name] to [value] in a Cluster
-cf, --cfile [file] Send [file] in a Cluster to /etc/csf/
-crs, --crestart    Cluster restart csf and lfd
-m, --mail [addr]   Display Server Check in HTML or email to [addr] if present
-lr, --logrun       Initiate Log Scanner report via lfd
-c, --check         Check for updates to csf but do not upgrade
-u, --update        Check for updates to csf and upgrade if available
-uf                 Force an update of csf
-x, --disable       Disable csf and lfd
-e, --enable        Enable csf and lfd if previously disabled
-v, --version       Show csf version

These options allow you to easily and quickly control and view csf. All the 
configuration files for csf are in /etc/csf and include:

csf.conf	- the main configuration file, it has helpful comments explaining
		  what each option does
csf.allow	- a list of IP's and CIDR addresses that should always be allowed 
		  through the firewall
csf.deny	- a list of IP's and CIDR addresses that should never be allowed
		  through the firewall
csf.ignore	- a list of IP's and CIDR addresses that lfd should ignore and not
		  not block if detected
csf.*ignore	- various ignore files that list files, users, IP's that lfd
		  should ignore. See each file for their specific purpose and
		 tax

If you modify any of the files listed above, you will need to restart csf to 
have them take effect. If you use the command line options to add or deny IP 
addresses, then csf automatically does this for you.

Both csf.allow and csf.deny can have comments after the IP address listed. The
comments must be on the same line as the IP address otherwise the IP rotation
of csf.deny will remove them.

If editing the csf.allow or csf.deny files directly, either from shell or the
WHM UI, you should put a <space>#<space> between the IP address and the comment
like this:

11.22.33.44 # Added because I don't like them

You can also include comments when using the csf -a or csf -d commands, but in
those cases you must not use a # like this:

csf -d 11.22.33.44 Added because I don't like them

If you use the shell commands then each comment line will be timestamped. You
will also find that if lfd blocks an IP address it will add a descriptive
comment plus timestamp.

If you don't want csf to rotate a particular IP in csf.deny if the line limit
is reach you can do so by adding "do not delete" within the comment field,
e.g.:

11.22.33.44 # Added because I don't like them. do not delete

You can also use an Include statement in either csf.allow or csf.deny to
include other files that conform to the above. You must specify the full path
to the included file, e.g. in /etc/csf/csf.allow:

Include /etc/csf/csf.alsoallow

Note: None of the csf commands for adding or removing IP addresses from 
csf.allow or csf.deny work on included files, they are treated as read-only.


5. lfd Command Line Options
###########################

lfd doesn't have any command line options of its own but is controlled through 
the init script /etc/init.d/lfd which stops and starts the daemon. It is 
configured using the /etc/csf/csf.conf file.

The best way to see what lfd is up to is to take a look in /var/log/lfd.log 
where its activities are logged.

The various email alert templates follow, care should be taken if you
modify that file to maintain the correct format:

/etc/csf/accounttracking.txt - for account tracking alert emails
/etc/csf/alert.txt - for port blocking emails
/etc/csf/connectiontracking.txt - for connection tracking emails
/etc/csf/cpanelalert.txt - for WHM/cPanel account access emails
/etc/csf/exploitalert.txt - for system exploit alert emails
/etc/csf/filealert.txt - for suspicious file alert emails
/etc/csf/integrityalert.txt - for system integrity alert emails
/etc/csf/loadalert.txt - for high load average alert emails
/etc/csf/logalert.txt - for log scanner report emails
/etc/csf/logfloodalert.txt - for log file flooding alert emails
/etc/csf/netblock.txt - for netblock alert emails
/etc/csf/permblock.txt - for temporary to permanent block alert emails
/etc/csf/portknocking.txt - for Port Knocking alert emails
/etc/csf/portscan.txt - for port scan tracking alert emails
/etc/csf/processtracking.txt - for process tracking alert emails
/etc/csf/queuealert.txt - for email queue alert emails
/etc/csf/relayalert.txt - for email relay alert emails
/etc/csf/resalert.txt - for process resource alert emails
/etc/csf/scriptalert.txt - for script alert emails
/etc/csf/sshalert.txt - for SSH login emails
/etc/csf/sualert.txt - for SU alert emails
/etc/csf/tracking.txt - for POP3/IMAP blocking emails
/etc/csf/uialert.txt - for UI alert emails
/etc/csf/usertracking.txt - for user process tracking alert emails
/etc/csf/watchalert.txt - for watched file and directory change alert emails


6. Login Tracking
#################

Login tracking is an extension of lfd, it keeps track of POP3 and IMAP logins
and limits them to X connections per hour per account per IP address. It uses
iptables to block offenders to the appropriate protocol port only and flushes
them every hour and starts counting logins afresh. All of these blocks are
temporary and can be cleared manually by restarting csf.

There are two settings, one of POP3 and one for IMAP logins. It's generally
not a good idea to track IMAP logins as many clients login each time to perform
a protocol transaction (there's no need for them to repeatedly login, but you
can't avoid bad client programming!). So, if you do have a need to have some
limit to IMAP logins, it is probably best to set the login limit quite high.

If you want to know when lfd temporarily blocks an IP address you can enable
the email tracking alerts option (which is on by default)

You can also add your own login failure tracking using regular expression
matching. Please read /etc/csf/regex.custom.pm for more information

Important Note: To enable successful SSHD login tracking you should ensure that
UseDNS in /etc/ssh/sshd_config is disabled by using:

UseDNS no

and that sshd has then been restarted.

7. Script Email Alerts
######################

(cPanel installations of csf only)

lfd can scan for emails being sent through exim from scripts on the server.

To use this feature you must add an extended email logging line to WHM >
Exim Configuration Editor > Switch to Advanced Mode > in the first textbox
add the following line:

log_selector = +arguments +subject +received_recipients

If you already already use extended exim logging, then you need to either
include +arguments or use +all

This setting will then send an alert email if more than LF_SCRIPT_LIMIT lines
appear with the same cwd= path in them within an hour. This can be useful in
identifying spamming scripts on a server, especially PHP scripts running
under the nobody account. The email that is sent includes the exim log lines
and also attempts to find scripts that send email in the path that may be the
culprit.

This option uses the /etc/csf/scriptalert text file for alert emails.

If you enable the option LF_SCRIPT_ALERT then lfd will disable the path using
chattr +i and chmod 000 so that the user cannot re-enable it. The alert email
also then includes the commands needed to re-enable the offending path.

Any false-positives can be added to /etc/csf/csf.signore and lfd will then
ignore those listed scripts.

8. Process Tracking
###################

This option enables tracking of user and nobody processes and examines them for
suspicious executables or open network ports. Its purpose is to identify
potential exploit processes that are running on the server, even if they are
obfuscated to appear as system services. If a suspicious process is found an
alert email is sent with relevant information.

It is then the responsibility of the recipient to investigate the process
further as the script takes no further action. Processes (PIDs) are only
reported once unless lfd is restarted.

There is an ignore file /etc/csf/csf.pignore which can be used to whitelist
either usernames or full paths to binaries. Care should be taken with ignoring
users or files so that you don't force false-negatives.

You must use the following format:

exe:/full/path/to/file
user:username
cmd:command line

The command line as reported in /proc has the trailing null character removed
and all other occurrences replaced with a space. So, the line you specify in
the file should have space separators for the command line arguments, not null
characters.

It is strongly recommended that you use command line ignores very carefully
as any process can change what is reported to the OS.

Don't list the paths to perl or php as this will prevent detection of
suspicious web scripts.

For more information on the difference between executable and command line, you
should read and understand how the linux /proc pseudo-filesystem works:

man proc
man lsof

It is beyond the scope of this application to explain how to investigate
processes in the linux /proc architecture.

The email alerts are sent using the processtracking.txt email template.

It should be noted that this feature will not pickup a root compromise as root
processes are ignored - you should use established IDS tools for such security
considerations.

*** NOTE *** You _will_ get false-positives with this particular feature. The
reason for the feature is to bring to your attention processes that have either
been running for a long time under a user account, or that have ports open
outside of your server. You should satisfy yourself that they are indeed false-
positives before either ignoring them or trapping them in the csf.pignore file.

We've done our best to minimise false-positives, but there's a balance between
being cautious and the sensitivity needed to pick up exploits.

The script itself cannot distinguish between malicious intent and intended
script function - that's your job as the server administrator ;-)

The setting PT_SKIP_HTTP does reduce the number of false-positives by not
checking scripts running directly or through CGI in Apache. However, disabling
this setting will make a more thorough job of detecting active exploits of all
varieties.

Another alternative might be to disable PT_SKIP_HTTP and increase PT_LIMIT to
avoid picking up web scripts, however this means that real exploits will run
for longer before they're picked up.

You can, of course, turn the feature off too - if you really want to.


9. Directory Watching
#####################

Directory Watching enables lfd to check /tmp and /dev/shm and other pertinent
directories for suspicious files, i.e. script exploits.

If a suspicious file is found an email alert is sent using the template
filealert.txt.

NOTE: Only one alert per file is sent until lfd is restarted, so if you remove
a suspicious file, remember to restart lfd

To remove any suspicious files found during directory watching, enable
corresponding setting the suspicious files will be appended to a tarball in
/etc/csf/suspicious.tar and deleted from their original location. Symlinks are
simply removed.

If you want to extract the tarball to your current location, use:

tar -xpf /etc/csf/suspicious.tar

This will preserver the path and permissions of the original file.

Any false-positives can be added to /etc/csf/csf.fignore and lfd will then
ignore those listed files and directories.

Within csf.fignore is a list of files that lfd directory watching will ignore.
You must specify the full path to the file

You can also use perl regular expression pattern matching, for example:
/tmp/clamav.*
/tmp/.*\.wrk

Remember that you will need to escape special characters (precede them with a
backslash) such as \. \?

Pattern matching will only occur with strings containing an asterisk (*),
otherwise full file path matching will be applied

You can also add entries to ignore files owner by a particular user by 
preceding it with user:, for example:
user:bob


Note: files owned by root are ignored

For information on perl regular expressions:
http://www.perl.com/doc/manual/html/pod/perlre.html

The second aspect of Directory Watching is enabled with LF_DIRWATCH_FILE. This
option allows you to have lfd watch a particular file or directory for changes
and should they change and email alert using watchalert.txt is sent. It uses a
simple md5sum match from the output of "ls -laAR" on the entry and so will
traverse directories if specified.


10. Advanced Allow/Deny Filters
###############################

In /etc/csf.allow and /etc/csf.deny you can add more complex port and ip
filters using the following format (you must specify a port AND an IP address):

tcp/udp|in/out|s/d=port|s/d=ip|u=uid

Broken down:

tcp/udp  : EITHER tcp OR udp OR icmp protocol
in/out   : EITHER incoming OR outgoing connections
s/d=port : EITHER source OR destination port number (or ICMP type)
           (use a _ for a port range, e.g. 2000_3000)
s/d=ip   : EITHER source OR destination IP address
u/g=UID  : EITHER UID or GID of source packet, implies outgoing connections,
           s/d=IP value is ignored

Note: ICMP filtering uses the "port" for s/d=port to set the ICMP type.
Whether you use s or d is not relevant as either simply uses the iptables
--icmp-type option. Use "iptables -p icmp -h" for a list of valid ICMP types.
Only one type per filter is supported

Examples:

# TCP connections inbound to port 3306 from IP 11.22.33.44
tcp|in|d=3306|s=11.22.33.44

# TCP connections outbound to port 22 on IP 11.22.33.44
tcp|out|d=22|d=11.22.33.44

Note| If omitted, the default protocol is set to "tcp", the default connection
direction is set to "in", so|

# TCP connections inbound to port 22 from IP 44.33.22.11
d=22|s=44.33.22.11

# TCP connections outbound to port 80 from UID 99
tcp|out|d=80||u=99

# ICMP connections inbound for type ping from 44.33.22.11
icmp|in|d=ping|s=44.33.22.11

# TCP connections inbound to port 22 from Dynamic DNS address
# www.configserver.com (for use in csf.dyndns only)
tcp|in|d=22|s=www.configserver.com


11. Multiple Ethernet Devices
#############################

If you have multiple ethernet NICs that you want to apply all rules to, then
you can set ETH_DEVICE to the interface name immediately followed by a plus
sign. For example, eth+ will apply all iptables rules to eth0, eth1, etc.

That said, if you leave ETH_DEVICE blank all rules will be applied to all
ethernet devices equally.


12. Installation on a Generic Linux Server
##########################################

csf+lfd can be configured to run on a generic Linux server. There are some
changes to the features available:

1. The default port range is for a typical non-cPanel web server and may need
   altering to suit the servers environment

2. The Process Tracking ignore file may need expanding in /etc/csf/csf.pignore
   to suit the server environment

3. A standard Webmin Module to configure csf is included - see the install.txt
   for more information

The codebase is the same for a all installations, the csf.conf file simply has
the cPanel specific options removed and the GENERIC option added


13. A note about FTP Connection Issues
######################################

It is important when using an SPI firewall to ensure FTP client applications
are configured to use Passive (PASV) mode connections to the server.

On servers running Monolithic kernels (e.g. VPS Virtuozzo/OpenVZ and custom
built kernels) ip_conntrack and ip_conntrack_ftp iptables kernel modules may
not be available or fully functional. If this happens, FTP passive mode (PASV)
won't work. In such circumstances you will have to open a hole in your firewall
and configure the FTP server to use that same hole.

For example, with pure-ftpd you could add the port range 30000:35000 to TCP_IN
and add the following line to /etc/pure-ftpd.conf and then restart pure-ftpd:
PassivePortRange	30000 35000

For example, with proftpd you could add the port range 30000:35000 to TCP_IN
and add the following line to /etc/proftpd.conf and then restart proftpd:
PassivePorts	30000 35000

FTP over SSL/TLS will usually fail when using an SPI firewall. This is because
of the way the FTP protocol established a connection between client and server.
iptables fails to establish a related connection when using FTP over SSL
because the FTP control connection is encrypted and so cannot track the
relationship between the connection and the allocation of an ephemeral port.

If you need to use FTP over SSL, you will have to open up a passive port block
in both csf and your FTP server configuration (see above).

Perversely, this makes your firewall less secure, while trying to make FTP
connections more secure.


14. Messenger Service
#####################

This feature allows the display of a message to a blocked connecting IP address
to inform the user that they are blocked in the firewall. This can help when
users get themselves blocked, e.g. due to multiple login failures. The service
is provided by two daemons running on ports providing either an HTML or TEXT
message.

This services uses the iptables nat table and the associated PREROUTING chain.
The ipt_REDIRECT module is used to redirect the incoming port to the relevant
messenger service server port.

Temporary and/or permanent (csf.deny) IP addresses can be serviced by this
feature.

It does NOT include redirection of any GLOBAL or BLOCK deny lists.

It does require the IO::Socket::INET perl module.

It does NOT work on servers that do not have the iptables module ipt_REDIRECT
loaded. Typically, this will be with Monolithic kernels. VPS server admins
should check with their VPS host provider that the iptables module is included.

If you change any of the files in /etc/csf/messenger/ you must restart lfd as
they are all cached in memory.

HTML Messenger Server
=====================

The HTML message that is displayed is provided by the file:

/etc/csf/messenger/index.html

The HTML server providing this page is very rudimentary but will accept the use
of linked images that are stored in the /etc/csf/messenger/ directory. The
images must be of either jpg, gif or png format. These images are loaded into
memory so you should keep the number and size to a minimum. No other linked
resource files are supported (e.g. .css, .js).

As the HTML server requires interaction with the client, there is a timer on
the connection to prevent port hogging.

The server has a built-in function that will replace the text [IPADDRESS] in
index.html with the IP address that is blocked by the firewall. This will help
the blocked user know what their blocked IP address is. You can also use the
text [HOSTAME] which will be replaced by the servers FQDN hostname.

The HTML server does not support SSL connections, so redirecting port 443 will
not work.

The HTML server port should not be added to the TCP_IN list.

There is a maximum of 15 port allowed in MESSENGER_HTML_IN.

TEXT Messenger Server
=====================

The TEXT message that is displayed is provided by the file:

/etc/csf/messenger.text

This file should only contain text. The TEXT server providing this file simply
sends the contents to the connecting port and no protocol exchange takes place.
this means that it may not be suitable for use with protocols such as POP3.

The server has a built-in function that will replace the text [IPADDRESS] in
index.text with the IP address that is blocked by the firewall. This will help
the blocked user know what their blocked IP address is. You can also use the
text [HOSTAME] which will be replaced by the servers FQDN hostname.

The TEXT server does not support SSL connections, so redirecting port 995 will
not work.

The TEXT server port should not be added to the TCP_IN list.

There is a maximum of 15 port allowed in MESSENGER_TEXT_IN.

Messenger User
==============

You should create a unique user that the messenger services will run under. 
This user should be disabled and have no shell access.

For example, you can create such an account (in this example called "csf") from
the root shell using:

useradd csf -s /bin/false


15. Block Reporting
###################

lfd can run an external script when it performs and IP address block following
for example a login failure. This is done by setting the configuration variable
BLOCK_REPORT to a script that must be executable. The following parameters are
passed the the script as arguments:

ARG 1 = IP Address	# The IP address or CIDR being blocked
ARG 2 = ports		# Port, comma separated list or * for all ports
ARG 3 = permanent	# 0=temporary block, 1=permanent block
ARG 4 = inout		# Direction of block: in, out or inout
ARG 5 = timeout		# If a temporary block, TTL in seconds, otherwise 0
ARG 6 = message		# Message containing reason for block
ARG 7 = logs		# The logs lines that triggered the block (will contain
                        # line feeds between each log line)
ARG 8 = trigger		# The configuration settings triggered

lfd launches the BLOCK_REPORT in a forked process which terminates after 10
seconds if not completed by then. It runs under the root account, so great care
should be exercised with regard to security of the BLOCK_REPORT script.


16. Port Flood Protection
#########################

This option configures iptables to offer protection from DOS attacks against
specific ports. This option limits the number of connections per time interval
that new connections can be made to specific ports.

This feature does not work on servers that do not have the iptables module
ipt_recent loaded. Typically, this will be with Monolithic kernels. VPS server
admins should check with their VPS host provider that the iptables module is
included.

By default ipt_recent tracks only the last 100 IP addresses. The tracked IP
addresses can be viewed in /proc/net/ipt_recent/* where the port number is the
filename.

Syntax for the PORTFLOOD setting:

PORTFLOOD is a comma separated list of:
port;protocol;hit count*;interval seconds

So, a setting of PORTFLOOD = "22;tcp;5;300,80;tcp;20;5" means:

1. If more than 5 connections to tcp port 22 within 300 seconds, then block
that IP address from port 22 for at least 300 seconds after the last packet is
seen, i.e. there must be a "quiet" period of 300 seconds before the block is
lifted

2. If more than 20 connections to tcp port 80 within 5 seconds, then block
that IP address from port 80 for at least 5 seconds after the last packet is
seen, i.e. there must be a "quiet" period of 5 seconds before the block is
lifted

More information about the ipt_recent module can be found in the iptables man
page and at http://snowman.net/projects/ipt_recent/

Note: Blocked IP addresses do not appear in any of the iptables chains when
using this module. You must manipulate the /proc/net/ipt_recent/* files as per
the module documentation to view and remove IP addresses that are currently
blocked if the blocks have not yet expired.

Restarting csf resets the ipt_recent tables and removes all of its blocks.

Note: There are some restrictions when using ipt_recent:

1. By default it only tracks 100 addresses per table (we try and increase this
to 1000 via modprobe)

2. By default it only counts 20 packets per address remembered

*This means that you need to keep the hit count to below 20.


17. External Pre- and Post- Scripts
###################################

External commands (e.g. iptables rules not covered by csf) can be run before
and/or after csf sets up the iptables chains and rules.

1. To run external commands before csf configures iptables create the file:

/etc/csf/csfpre.sh

Set that file as executable and add an appropriate shebang interpreter line and
then whatever external commands you wish to execute.

For example:

#!/bin/sh
/some/path/to/binary -a -b -c etc

Then chmod +x /etc/csf/csfpre.sh

2. To run external commands after csf configures iptables create the file:

/etc/csf/csfpost.sh

Set that file as executable and add an appropriate shebang interpreter line and
then whatever external commands you wish to execute.


18. lfd Clustering
##################

This new set of options (CLUSTER*) in csf.conf allows the configuration of an
lfd cluster environment where a group of servers can share blocks and, via the
CLI, configuration option changes, allows and removes

In the configuration there are two comma separated lists of IP addresses:

CLUSTER_SENDTO = ""
CLUSTER_RECVFROM = ""

If you want all members of the lfd cluster to send block notifications to each
other then both settings should be them same. You also need to enable
CLUSTER_BLOCK (enabled by default) for lfd to automatically send blocks to all
members in CLUSTER_SENDTO.

However, you can also set up a cluster such that some members only provide
notifications to others and do not accept blocks from others. For example, you
may have a cluster of servers that includes one that hosts a support desk that
you do not want to block clients from accessing. In such an example you might
want to exclude the support desk server from the CLUSTER RECVFROM list, but
include it in the CLUSTER_SENDTO list.

The option CLUSTER_MASTER is the IP address of the master node in the cluster
allowed to send CLUSTER_CONFIG changes to servers listed in the local
CLUSTER_SENDTO list. Only cluster members that have CLUSTER_MASTER set to this
IP address will accept CLUSTER_CONFIG changes.

There is another option, CLUSTER_NAT that should be used if the IP address of
the server does not appear in ifconfig, for example if it is a NAT
configuration. If this is the case, add the IP address of the server that this
configuration is on and used in CLUSTER_SENDTO/CLUSTER_RECVFROM to CLUSTER_NAT.

CLUSTER_LOCALADDR can be set if you do not want to use the servers main IP,
i.e. the first one listed via 0.0.0.0.

The CLUSTER_PORT must be set to the same port on all servers. The port should
NOT be opened in TCP_IN or TCP_OUT as csf will automatically add appropriate in
and out bound rules to allow communication between cluster members.

The CLUSTER_KEY is a secret key used to encrypt cluster communications using
the Blowfish algorithm. It should be between 8 and 56 characters long, longer
is better, and must be the same on all members of the cluster.

This key must be kept secret!

When blocks are sent around the cluster they will maintain their originals
parameters, e.g. permanent/temporary, direction (in/out), ports, etc. All
blocks are traded except for LT_POP3D and LT_IMAPD.

The cluster uses 10 second timeouts in its communications, if the timeout is
reached then that cluster members notification will be lost.


lfd Cluster CLI and UI
======================

See csf --help for the list of new CLI commands. Additional options will
automatically become available in the UI once CLUSTER_SENDTO has been
configured.

Only cluster members listed in CLUSTER_RECVFROM can send out requests to those
members listed in CLUSTER_SENDTO.

Only the server listed in CLUSTER_MASTER will be accepted as the source of
CLUSTER_CONFIG configuration option requests, such as:
--cconfig, --cfile, --crestart

The CLI options --cfile and --cfiler allow you to synchronise csf configuration
files throughout a cluster from the CLUSTER_MASTER server.

There is currently only provision for permanent simple IP denies and allows
from the CLI (i.e. not Allow/Deny Filters).

The cluster PING sends a ping to each CLUSTER_SENDTO member which will report
the request in their respective lfd.log files. This is intended as a test to
confirm that cluster communications are functioning.

The options to change the configuration option in csf.conf in cluster members
should be used with caution to ensure that member specific options are not
overwritten. The intention of the two options is that the --cconfig option be
used if multiple changes are required and the final request is a --cconfigr to
restart csf and lfd to effect the requested changes immediately.


A Note on lfd Cluster Security
==============================

The clustering option is undoubtedly powerful in allowing servers to
pre-emptively block access attempts as one server is hit before the attack can
spread to other members of the cluster.

This communication, however, does introduce a security risk. Since 
communications are made over the network, they are open to interception. Also,
there is nothing to stop any local user from accessing the network port and
sending data to it, though it will be discarded unless properly encrypted[*].

There are security measures implemented to help mitigate attacks:

1. csf constructs iptables rules such that only cluster members can communicate
over the cluster port with each other

2. The clustered servers will only accept data from connections from IPs listed
in CLUSTER_RECVFROM or CLUSTER_MASTER

3. [*]All communications are encrypted using the Blowfish symmetric block cipher
through a Pure Perl cpan module using the Cipher Block Chaining module and the
configured CLUSTER_KEY

4. CLUSTER_CONFIG set to 0 prevents the processing of configuration option
requests

5. Only CLUSTER_MASTER will be accepted as the source of CLUSTER_CONFIG
configuration option requests

Should the configured secret key (passphrase) be compromised or guessed or a
flaw found in the encryption modules or their implementation in csf, a
malicious connection could reconfigure the csf firewall and then leverage a
local or remote root escalation. This should be considered if you decide to use
this option.

THERE ARE NO GUARANTEES OR WARRANTIES PROVIDED THAT THIS FACILITY IS SECURE AND
ANY DAMAGE ARISING FROM THE EXPLOITATION OF THIS OPTION IS ENTIRELY AT YOUR OWN
RISK.


19. Watching IP Addresses
#########################

The CLI option csf --watch [ip] (csf -w [ip]) and configuration option
WATCH_MODE logs TCP connection initiation (SYN) packets from a specified source
as they traverse the iptables chains.

This can be extremely useful in tracking where that IP address is being DROPed
or ACCEPTed by iptables.

WATCH_MODE should be used when watching IP addresses, although the csf -w [ip]
option will still work without it but won't necessarily provide conclusive
information on the final destination of the packet.

WATCH_MODE is disabled by default and should be left as such unless actively
watching an IP address as it will add an overhead to all accepted iptables
traffic and increase overall iptables kernel logging through syslog.

WATCH_MODE disables: DROP_NOLOG, PS_INTERVAL, DROP_ONLYRES
WATCH_MODE enabled: DROP_LOGGING, DROP_IP_LOGGING, DROP_PF_LOGGING
WATCH_MODE also logs iptables ACCEPT for watched IP addresses

You should only watch a very small number of IP addresses at a time and for a
very short period of time, otherwise the kernel log (usually /var/log/messages)
will become flooded with entries. Also, any IP address rules added during the
time of the watch will not necessarily be included in the logging rules for the
watched IP addresses.

IP address watches do not survive a csf (iptables) restart.

You can use either an IP address or a CIDR address for csf -w [ip].

Recommended method to use this function:

1. Enable WATCH_MODE

2. Restart csf

3. Restart lfd

4. Use the following to watch an IP:

csf -w 11.22.33.44

5. Watch the kernel iptables log for hits from the watched IP address

Once you have finished watching an IP address you should:

1. Disable WATCH_MODE

2. Restart csf (which will also remove the watched ip rules)

3. Restart lfd

The kernel iptables log lines for watching an IP (usually in /var/log/messages)
contain the direction of the packet in the chain and the chain name, e.g.
I:INPUT is Incoming to the chain INPUT, O:LOCALINPUT is Outgoing from chain
LOCALINPUT.

The following is a trimmed down example log watch of 192.168.254.4 connecting
to port 22:

Firewall: I:INPUT SRC=192.168.254.4 DST=192.168.254.71 PROTO=TCP DPT=22
Firewall: I:LOCALINPUT SRC=192.168.254.4 DST=192.168.254.71 PROTO=TCP DPT=22
Firewall: I:GDENYIN SRC=192.168.254.4 DST=192.168.254.71 PROTO=TCP DPT=22
Firewall: O:GDENYIN SRC=192.168.254.4 DST=192.168.254.71 PROTO=TCP DPT=22
Firewall: I:DSHIELD SRC=192.168.254.4 DST=192.168.254.71 PROTO=TCP DPT=22
Firewall: O:DSHIELD SRC=192.168.254.4 DST=192.168.254.71 PROTO=TCP DPT=22
Firewall: I:SPAMHAUS SRC=192.168.254.4 DST=192.168.254.71 PROTO=TCP DPT=22
Firewall: O:SPAMHAUS SRC=192.168.254.4 DST=192.168.254.71 PROTO=TCP DPT=22
Firewall: O:LOCALINPUT SRC=192.168.254.4 DST=192.168.254.71 PROTO=TCP DPT=22
Firewall: I:INVALID SRC=192.168.254.4 DST=192.168.254.71 PROTO=TCP DPT=22
Firewall: O:INVALID SRC=192.168.254.4 DST=192.168.254.71 PROTO=TCP DPT=22
Firewall: I:LOGACCEPT SRC=192.168.254.4 DST=192.168.254.71 PROTO=TCP DPT=22


20. Port Knocking
#################

This option configures iptables to offer port knocking to open sensitive ports
based on a sequence of knocked ports for the connecting IP address.

For mor information on the idea of port knocking see:
http://www.portknocking.org/

The feature requires that you list a random selection of unused ports (at least
3) with a timeout. The ports you choose must not be in use and not appear in
TCP_IN (UDP_IN for udp packets). The port to be opened must also not appear in
TCP_IN (UDP_IN for udp packets).

This feature does not work on servers that do not have the iptables module
ipt_recent loaded. Typically, this will be with Monolithic kernels. VPS server
admins should check with their VPS host provider that the iptables module is
included.

By default ipt_recent tracks only the last 100 IP addresses. The tracked IP
addresses can be viewed in /proc/net/ipt_recent/*

Syntax for the PORTKNOCKING setting:

PORTKNOCKING is a comma separated list of:
openport;protocol;timeout;kport1;kport2;kport3[...;kportN]

So, a setting of PORTKNOCKING = "22;TCP;20;100;200;300;400" means:

Open Port 22 TCP for 20 seconds to the connecting IP address to new connections
once ports 100, 200, 300 and 400 have been accessed (i.e. knocked with a SYN
packet) each knock being less than 20 seconds apart.

Access to port 22 remains active after 20 seconds until the connection is
dropped, however new connections will not be allowed.

More information about the ipt_recent module can be found in the iptables man
page and at http://snowman.net/projects/ipt_recent/

Note: IP addresses do not appear in any of the iptables chains when using this
module. You must view the /proc/net/ipt_recent/* files as per the module
documentation to view IP addresses in the various stages of the knock.

Restarting csf resets the ipt_recent tables and removes all of the knocks.


21. Connection Limit Protection
###############################

This option configures iptables to offer protection from DOS attacks against
specific ports. It can also be used as a way to simply limit resource usage by
IP address to specific server services. This option limits the number of new
concurrent connections per IP address that can be made to specific ports.

This feature does not work on servers that do not have the iptables module
xt_connlimit loaded. Typically, this will be with Monolithic kernels. VPS
server admins should check with their VPS host provider that the iptables
module is included.

Also, although included in some older versions or RedHat/CentOS, it was only
actually available from v5.3+

The protection can only be applied to the TCP protocol.

Syntax for the CONNLIMIT setting:

CONNLIMIT is a comma separated list of:
port;limit

So, a setting of CONNLIMIT = "22;5,80;20" means:

1. Only allow up to 5 concurrent new connections to port 22 per IP address

2. Only allow up to 20 concurrent new connections to port 80 per IP address

Note: Existing connections are not included in the count, only new SYN packets,
i.e. new connections

Note: Run /etc/csf/csftest.pl to check whether this option will function on the
server


22. Port/IP address Redirection
###############################

This feature uses the file /etc/csf/csf.redirect which is a list of port and/or
IP address assignments to direct traffic to alternative ports/IP addresses.

Requirements:
  nat tables
  ipt_DNAT iptables module
  ipt_SNAT iptables module
  ipt_REDIRECT iptables module

The following are the allowed redirection formats

DNAT (redirect from one IP address to a different one):
IPx|*|IPy|*|tcp/udp          - To IPx redirects to IPy
IPx|portA|IPy|portB|tcp/udp  - To IPx to portA redirects to IPy portB

DNAT examples:
192.168.254.62|*|10.0.0.1|*|tcp
192.168.254.62|666|10.0.0.1|25|tcp

REDIRECT (redirect from port to a different one):
IPx|portA|*|portB|tcp/udp    - To IPx to portA redirects to portB
*|portA|*|portB|tcp/udp      - To portA redirects to portB

REDIRECT examples:
*|666|*|25|tcp
192.168.254.60|666|*|25|tcp
192.168.254.4|666|*|25|tcp

Where a port is specified it cannot be a range, only a single port.

All redirections to another IP address will always appear on the destination
server with the source of this server, not the originating IP address.

This feature is not intended to be used for routing, NAT, VPN, etc tasks

Note: /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward must be set to 1 for DNAT connections to
work. csf will set this where it can, but if the kernel value cannot be set
then the DNAT redirection many not work.


23. Integrated User Interface Feature
#####################################

Integrated User Interface. This feature provides a HTML UI to the features of
csf and lfd, without requiring a control panel or web server. The UI runs as a
sub process to the lfd daemon.

As it runs under the root account and successful login provides root access
to the server, great care should be taken when configuring and using this
feature. There are additional restrictions to enhance secure access to the
UI:

  1. An SSL connection is required
  2. Separate ban and allow files are provided to only allow access to listed
     IP addresses
  3. Local IP addresses cannot connect to the UI (i.e. all IP addresses
     configured on the server NICs)
  4. Unique sessions, session timeouts, session cookies and browser headers are
     used to identify and restrict active sessions

Requirements:

  1. openssl
  2. Perl modules: Net::SSLeay, IO::Socket::SSL and dependent modules
  4. SSL keys
  5. Entries in /etc/csf/ui/ui.allow

The SSL server uses the following files:

  SSL Key goes into /etc/csf/ui/server.key
  SSL Certificate goes into /etc/csf/ui/server.crt

Preferably, real CA signed certificates should be used. You can use an
existing domain and cert for accessing the UI by populating the two files
mentioned. If the cert has a ca bundle, it should be appended to the server.crt
file. lfd must be restarted after making any changes:
http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/ssl/ssl_faq.html#realcert

Alternatively, you could generate your own self-signed certificate:
http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/ssl/ssl_faq.html#selfcert

Any keys used must have their pass-phrase removed:
http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/ssl/ssl_faq.html#removepassphrase

The login URL should use the domain you have listed in the self-signed cert:
https://<yourdomain>:<port>

For example: https://www.somedomain.com:6666

Your browser must accept session cookies to gain access.

UI_ALLOW is enabled by default, so IP addresses (or CIDRs) allowed to use this
UI must be listed in /etc/csf/ui/ui.allow before trying to connect to the UI.

Only IP addresses can be listed/used in /etc/csf/ui/ui.ban - this file should
only be used by the UI to prevent login. Use csf blocks to prevent access to
the configured port and only use Advanced Allow/Deny Filters for access, i.e.
do not list the port in TCP_IN.

Logging for UI events are logged to the lfd /var/log/lfd.log file. Check this
file if you are unable to access the UI.

Required Perl Modules:

  For example, on Debian v6 the perl modules can be installed using:

    apt-get install libio-socket-ssl-perl libcrypt-ssleay-perl \
                    libnet-libidn-perl libio-socket-inet6-perl libsocket6-perl

  For example, on CentOS v6 the perl modules can be installed using:

    yum install perl-IO-Socket-SSL.noarch perl-Net-SSLeay perl-Net-LibIDN \
                perl-IO-Socket-INET6 perl-Socket6

Install Process...

fedora@fedora ~/csf/csf> sudo ./install.sh 
[sudo] password for fedora: 

Configuring for OS

Running csf generic installer

Installing generic csf and lfd

Check we're running as root

Checking Perl modules...Using configuration defaults
ok

mkdir: created directory `/etc/csf'
mkdir: created directory `/etc/csf/zone'
mkdir: created directory `/etc/csf/stats'
mkdir: created directory `/etc/csf/lock'
`csf.generic.conf' -> `/etc/csf/csf.conf'
`csf.allow' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.allow'
`csf.deny' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.deny'
`csf.redirect' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.redirect'
`csf.dirwatch' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.dirwatch'
`csf.logfiles' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.logfiles'
`csf.logignore' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.logignore'
`logalert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./logalert.txt'
`csf.ignore' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.ignore'
`csf.generic.pignore' -> `/etc/csf/csf.pignore'
`csf.rignore' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.rignore'
`csf.fignore' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.fignore'
`csf.signore' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.signore'
`csf.suignore' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.suignore'
`csf.mignore' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.mignore'
`csf.sips' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.sips'
`csf.dyndns' -> `/etc/csf/./csf.dyndns'
`alert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./alert.txt'
`logfloodalert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./logfloodalert.txt'
`syslogalert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./syslogalert.txt'
`integrityalert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./integrityalert.txt'
`exploitalert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./exploitalert.txt'
`tracking.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./tracking.txt'
`connectiontracking.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./connectiontracking.txt'
`processtracking.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./processtracking.txt'
`accounttracking.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./accounttracking.txt'
`usertracking.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./usertracking.txt'
`sshalert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./sshalert.txt'
`sualert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./sualert.txt'
`consolealert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./consolealert.txt'
`uialert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./uialert.txt'
`scriptalert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./scriptalert.txt'
`filealert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./filealert.txt'
`watchalert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./watchalert.txt'
`loadalert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./loadalert.txt'
`resalert.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./resalert.txt'
`portscan.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./portscan.txt'
`permblock.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./permblock.txt'
`netblock.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./netblock.txt'
`messenger' -> `/etc/csf/./messenger'
`messenger/index.text' -> `/etc/csf/./messenger/index.text'
`messenger/index.html' -> `/etc/csf/./messenger/index.html'
`messenger/csf_small.png' -> `/etc/csf/./messenger/csf_small.png'
`ui' -> `/etc/csf/./ui'
`ui/ui.allow' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/ui.allow'
`ui/server.key' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/server.key'
`ui/images' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images'
`ui/images/LICENSE.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/LICENSE.txt'
`ui/images/plus.png' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/plus.png'
`ui/images/viewdelivery.png' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/viewdelivery.png'
`ui/images/minus.png' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/minus.png'
`ui/images/delete.png' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/delete.png'
`ui/images/cxs.png' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/cxs.png'
`ui/images/cse_small.png' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/cse_small.png'
`ui/images/ip.png' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/ip.png'
`ui/images/cxs_small.png' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/cxs_small.png'
`ui/images/cxs-loader.gif' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/cxs-loader.gif'
`ui/images/csf_small.png' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/csf_small.png'
`ui/images/icon.gif' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/icon.gif'
`ui/images/deliver.png' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/deliver.png'
`ui/images/perm.png' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/images/perm.png'
`ui/server.crt' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/server.crt'
`ui/ui.ban' -> `/etc/csf/./ui/ui.ban'
`portknocking.txt' -> `/etc/csf/./portknocking.txt'
`regex.custom.pm' -> `/etc/csf/./regex.custom.pm'
`pt_deleted_action.pl' -> `/etc/csf/./pt_deleted_action.pl'
`lfd.logrotate' -> `/etc/logrotate.d/lfd'
`csfcron.sh' -> `/etc/cron.d/csfcron.sh'
`lfdcron.sh' -> `/etc/cron.d/lfdcron.sh'
`csf.pl' -> `/etc/csf/csf.pl'
`csfui.pl' -> `/etc/csf/csfui.pl'
`cseui.pl' -> `/etc/csf/cseui.pl'
`csftest.pl' -> `/etc/csf/csftest.pl'
`lfd.pl' -> `/etc/csf/lfd.pl'
`regex.pm' -> `/etc/csf/regex.pm'
`servercheck.pm' -> `/etc/csf/servercheck.pm'
`readme.txt' -> `/etc/csf/readme.txt'
`sanity.txt' -> `/etc/csf/sanity.txt'
`x-arf.txt' -> `/etc/csf/x-arf.txt'
`changelog.txt' -> `/etc/csf/changelog.txt'
`install.txt' -> `/etc/csf/install.txt'
`version.txt' -> `/etc/csf/version.txt'
`license.txt' -> `/etc/csf/license.txt'
`uninstall.generic.sh' -> `/etc/csf/uninstall.sh'
`remove_apf_bfd.sh' -> `/etc/csf/remove_apf_bfd.sh'
`lfd.sh' -> `/etc/init.d/lfd'
`csf.sh' -> `/etc/init.d/csf'
`Net' -> `/etc/csf/Net'
`Net/CIDR' -> `/etc/csf/Net/CIDR'
`Net/CIDR/Lite.pm' -> `/etc/csf/Net/CIDR/Lite.pm'
`Geo' -> `/etc/csf/Geo'
`Geo/IP' -> `/etc/csf/Geo/IP'
`Geo/IP/PurePerl.pm' -> `/etc/csf/Geo/IP/PurePerl.pm'
`Crypt' -> `/etc/csf/Crypt'
`Crypt/Blowfish_PP.pm' -> `/etc/csf/Crypt/Blowfish_PP.pm'
`Crypt/CBC.pm' -> `/etc/csf/Crypt/CBC.pm'
`csf.div' -> `/etc/csf/csf.div'
`ui/images/LICENSE.txt' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/LICENSE.txt'
`ui/images/plus.png' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/plus.png'
`ui/images/viewdelivery.png' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/viewdelivery.png'
`ui/images/minus.png' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/minus.png'
`ui/images/delete.png' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/delete.png'
`ui/images/cxs.png' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/cxs.png'
`ui/images/cse_small.png' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/cse_small.png'
`ui/images/ip.png' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/ip.png'
`ui/images/cxs_small.png' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/cxs_small.png'
`ui/images/cxs-loader.gif' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/cxs-loader.gif'
`ui/images/csf_small.png' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/csf_small.png'
`ui/images/icon.gif' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/icon.gif'
`ui/images/deliver.png' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/deliver.png'
`ui/images/perm.png' -> `/etc/csf/ui/./images/perm.png'
chmod: cannot access `/var/log/lfd.log*': No such file or directory
mode of `/etc/csf/cseui.pl' changed from 0600 (rw-------) to 0700 (rwx------)
mode of `/etc/csf/csf.pl' changed from 0600 (rw-------) to 0700 (rwx------)
mode of `/etc/csf/csftest.pl' changed from 0600 (rw-------) to 0700 (rwx------)
mode of `/etc/csf/csfui.pl' changed from 0600 (rw-------) to 0700 (rwx------)
mode of `/etc/csf/lfd.pl' changed from 0600 (rw-------) to 0700 (rwx------)
mode of `/etc/csf/pt_deleted_action.pl' changed from 0600 (rw-------) to 0700 (rwx------)
mode of `/etc/csf/regex.custom.pm' changed from 0600 (rw-------) to 0700 (rwx------)
mode of `/etc/csf/regex.pm' changed from 0600 (rw-------) to 0700 (rwx------)
mode of `/etc/csf/servercheck.pm' changed from 0600 (rw-------) to 0700 (rwx------)
mode of `/etc/csf/remove_apf_bfd.sh' changed from 0600 (rw-------) to 0700 (rwx------)
mode of `/etc/csf/uninstall.sh' changed from 0600 (rw-------) to 0700 (rwx------)
chmod: cannot access `/etc/csf/*.php': No such file or directory
failed to change mode of `/etc/csf/*.php' from 0000 (---------) to 0000 (---------)
mode of `/etc/init.d/lfd' changed from 0755 (rwxr-xr-x) to 0700 (rwx------)
mode of `/etc/init.d/csf' changed from 0755 (rwxr-xr-x) to 0700 (rwx------)
mode of `/etc/cron.d/lfdcron.sh' changed from 0755 (rwxr-xr-x) to 0644 (rw-r--r--)
mode of `/etc/cron.d/csfcron.sh' changed from 0755 (rwxr-xr-x) to 0644 (rw-r--r--)
`/usr/sbin/csf' -> `/etc/csf/csf.pl'
`/usr/sbin/lfd' -> `/etc/csf/lfd.pl'

TCP ports currently listening for incoming connections:
111,53610

UDP ports currently listening for incoming connections:
111,123,323,998,5353,35526,48113

Note: The port details above are for information only, csf hasn't been auto-configured.

Don't forget to:
1. Configure the following options in the csf configuration to suite your server: TCP_*, UDP_*
2. Restart csf and lfd
3. Set TESTING to 0 once you're happy with the firewall

Installation Completed

fedora@fedora ~/csf/csf>


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Page last modified on December 14, 2012, at 08:58 PM